Would you love to be a triage nurse? Or have you been wanting to learn more about them? In this article, we would be talking about how much a triage nurse makes, what are their responsibilities, and how you qualify for it if you are interested. 


Triage nurses are known for several things. Some people call them telehealth nurses, others telephone triage, and while others call them telepathology nurses. We also have some triage nurses who work in the emergency room and also check on patients in person. Triage nurses do most of their work on the phones and converse with patients who are unable to get to a doctor's office. 


Continue to read on to have in-depth knowledge about this job – what they do, what they make, and see if the job is ideal for you. 


All about triage nurse job

Triage nurses are so important. From those that attend to people on phones to those working in the emergency unit, these nurses play a vital role. They assess and monitor patients' conditions and also help the other nurses and physicians to free up their time to give care to patients that need them quickly. 


How much do they make and what are their responsibilities?

For nurses in this career path, their salary ranges and also depends on the location you are in and how much experience you have. The median salary annually for registered triage nurses around June 2020 was $70,302. It ranges from $64,000 to nearly $80,000 a year. 


Triage nurse responsibilities

The responsibilities of a triage nurse defer to whether you work in the emergency section or on the telephone. 


Telephone Triage Nurse

This kind of triage nurse works majorly on the phone to converse with patients about their medical issues. They carry out several tasks such as: 

  • Educate patients about alternative methods to manage their symptoms 
  • Schedule appointments and send patients to experts 
  • Consult patients over the phone or through video chat services
  • Assist medical response teams in transporting patients to the hospital
  • Quickly assess the severity of a patient's condition and offer the best course of action.


While the roles of a triage nurse that works in the emergency department are:

  • Assess patients 
  • If required, initiate emergency care 
  • Reassess patients in the waiting room  
  • Manage and interact with patients in the waiting room  
  • Educate patients and their families 
  • Transport patients to suitable treatment locations 
  • Qualifications 
  • Sort patients into priority groups according to criteria


The skills needed are:

  • Triage education course 
  • Emergency department experience
  • Multitasking
  • Emergency department experience

Although the American Academy Care Nursing isn't necessary it will assist you to prepare for the job and make you competitive.

What Is Done in Triage?

Triage nurses work in extremely crowded hospitals and emergency rooms. Consider it a system for categorizing and allocating scarce healthcare resources.

They will collect vital signs and information from patients before sorting them according to urgency and other criteria established by the hospital.

The way nurses organize patients differs from one hospital to the next

Is it possible for an LPN to work as a triage nurse?

LPNs are rarely hired as triage nurses in hospitals. LPNs may be able to land certain telephone triage employment, but practically all positions require an RN. Hospitals prefer to recruit registered nurses because they have the knowledge and expertise to conduct complete and accurate examinations.


Conclusion

This position is critical in the emergency department. Nurses who serve as telephone triage nurses and nurses who deal directly with patients in the hospital both provide vital services to the health care professionals around them.

This is the ideal profession for someone who enjoys working in a fast-paced environment where they must think rapidly on their feet.

It's a demanding profession that necessitates nurses' attention to tiny details and prioritization of care. Patients' initial point of contact in the ER is usually them, and nurses rely on their evaluations.


June 6, 2021

Natasha Osei

Passionate Nurse Practitioner | People person

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