What Are the Benefits of a Nursing Career?

While fast-paced and demanding, nursing may also provide a sense of fulfillment and purpose. Nursing presents you with diverse opportunities as this occupation has various positions.

Discover the benefits of a career in nursing and learn how to land a position at the hospital or healthcare provider of your choosing with these additional resources.

Benefits of Being a Nurse

There are numerous advantages to working as a nurse, including a stable career, respectable wage, and several enticing perks. Consider being a traveling nurse if you live in a region where nursing employment is scarce, and you want to work in a city or healthcare facility where demand is high.

Being a nurse also has the following advantages:

  • Nursing allows you to set your working hours to accommodate personal and family obligations.
  • Sufficient room for progression, especially in medical institutes that offer ongoing education programs for nurses.
  • It presents the option to focus on a particular area of nursing expertise, like pediatrics or labor and delivery.
  • Nursing necessitates a simple uniform consisting primarily of scrubs and slip-on shoes.
  • The nurse has a chance to help people recover from injuries and diseases.

Pointers to Help You Become a Nurse

Although nursing jobs are plentiful and in high demand, you may face competition on the path to an ideal nursing career. Here are a few pointers to keep in mind if you're looking for work in nursing.

The more you learn, the better you will be 

Many employers prefer nurses who plan to continue their education over those who don't. Furthering your education can also lead to better pay and more career options in the future.

Connect with other professionals in your field 

You may develop a strong network of relevant references and connections if you connect with healthcare professionals at every level. It's also possible that these people will be able to help when a new post becomes available at their hospital or department.

Volunteer your services 

Even if you don't get paid, volunteering demonstrates to others your genuine commitment to the nursing profession. The ability to do this can help you gain the attention of upper-level management, who can then recommend or recruit you for your ideal job.

Make your resume specific to the positions you're interested in 

The days of one-size-fits-all resumes are long gone. Instead, when searching for a job you're passionate about, make sure your CV is up to date to reflect your most relevant abilities and experience.

To find jobs in the healthcare and nursing fields, use job portals that focus on these fields solely. If you're looking for a job, these job boards can save you time and expose you to a greater number of open positions for which you are qualified.

What Other High-Paying Healthcare Positions Are There?

As of 2022, U.S. News and World Report have nurse practitioners as the best health care jobs, and as the second-best job of all time in their list of the 100 best jobs. A nurse practitioner's pay in the United States is $111,680 on average, according to the report. If you're not convinced about nursing as a career path, here are other top healthcare careers in the United States:

  • Physician assistants diagnose and treat patients alongside doctors and surgeons.
  • Speech-language pathologists are involved in treating children and adults with speech-language impediments.
  • Medics are trained in the diagnosis, treatment, and prevention of disease and sickness
  • Registered nurses monitor patients, administer prescriptions, and chart their progress. Their median income in the United States is $75,330. 
  • Respiratory therapists help detect and treat different respiratory and breathing problems.
  • Oral and maxillofacial surgeons are specialists in oral and maxillofacial surgery.
  • Nurse anesthetists are saddled with the responsibility of preparing patients for surgery by administering anesthetic and monitoring their recovery afterward. They earn about $183,580 per year on average in the United States.

Conclusion

The time it takes to become a nurse varies across specialties, ranging from a year to four years. However, if nursing is something you've always wanted to do, it's never too late to start now.

August 11, 2022

Natasha Osei

Passionate Nurse Practitioner | People person
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